It’s Eerie How Much Jackie Kennedy’s Granddaughter Looks Like The Former First Lady

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The name might not be familiar to you, but the face almost certainly is. Rose Schlossberg is an aspiring actress, but that isn’t exactly why she’s made headlines. Rather, she’s grabbed people’s attentions due to her uncanny likeness to her grandmother. Unsurprising, perhaps, considering that this grandparent is the late Jackie Kennedy.

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Jacqueline Lee Bouvier was born in Southampton, New York, in July 1929. Her father worked on Wall Street, and her mother was a socialite. At one point she worked as a Washington Times-Herald photographer, but she later entered the Kennedy dynasty. Indeed, in 1953 she married a young U.S. senator named John Fitzgerald Kennedy, giving birth to daughter Caroline four years later.

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Of course, Jackie’s life could have followed a very different course had she remained with her first fiancé. In 1952 the icon was briefly engaged to stockbroker John G.W. Husted Jr. After a few months, however, she decided to give him the boot after allegedly realizing he was “immature and boring.”

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It proved to be a wise decision, and just a year later Jackie did manage to walk down the aisle to marry John F. Kennedy. Sadly though, in keeping with the supposed Kennedy family curse, Jackie and JFK went on to experience their fair share of tragedy. In 1955, for instance, Jackie miscarried the couple’s first child, and a year later their daughter Arabella arrived stillborn. But thankfully, the birth of daughter Caroline occurred successfully in 1957.

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Around the time that Jackie had given birth to Caroline, she was also hitting the campaign trail to help her husband get re-elected to the Senate. JFK himself would later describe her support as “simply invaluable.” She also played a pivotal role in his bid to become the 35th President of the United States.

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The Kennedys’ lives changed forever when John was elected President – just two weeks before their son, John F. Kennedy Jr., was born. When JFK was sworn in two months later, Jackie – at the age of 31 – became First Lady. She was among the youngest to ever serve in this role, and she became an instant tabloid sensation.

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Indeed, Jackie was the first presidential spouse to employ her very own press secretary. She also became something of a style icon thanks to her designer wardrobe and commitment to restoring the interior of the White House. But, of course, her world soon came crashing down after one of the most infamous events in American history.

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Jackie’s horrific year began in early 1963, when she fell pregnant for a fifth time, forcing her to cut back on her First Lady responsibilities. Tragically, after being born five weeks prematurely, Patrick Kennedy passed away from hyaline membrane disease. And just months later, Jackie went through even more unspeakable heartache.

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When the President and the First Lady were being transported in a motorcade during a trip to Dallas, Texas, in November 1963, JFK was fatally shot. The historic tragedy was caught on camera, as was Jackie’s horrified reaction. She later played an instrumental role in organizing the late president’s funeral.

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After that, Jackie tried to shield herself, young Caroline and John Jr. from the media spotlight. Yet in the years to come she remained a fixture on the front pages and television – in part due to her continued support for JFK’s brother Robert. Then, just months after he too was assassinated in 1968, Jackie married her long-time friend, Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis.

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Yet Jackie – who had taken the name Onassis – found herself widowed for a second time when, in 1975, her husband passed away due to respiratory failure. Having enjoyed a peripatetic existence, she subsequently returned to the U.S., where she served as a publishing editor. But then, just months after being diagnosed with cancer, Jackie tragically succumbed to the illness in 1994, aged 64.

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Jackie’s son John F. Kennedy Jr. officially delivered the news to the world’s press. He said that his mother had been “surrounded by her friends and her family and her books, and the people and the things that she loved. She did it in her very own way, and on her own terms, and we all feel lucky for that.”

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Jackie was credited with dramatically changing the way that First Ladies are now viewed. Carl Sferrazza Anthony, a noted historian, argued that she “became an aspirational figure of that era. One whose privilege might not be easily reached by a majority of Americans, but which others could strive to emulate.”

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Jackie’s funeral was held at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola. This was also where she’d been confirmed in her teenage years, as well as where she’d been baptized as a baby. She was interred alongside her late husband and the two children she’d lost – Arabella and Patrick – at Arlington National Cemetery.

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Just five years later, tragedy struck the Kennedy clan once again when Jackie’s son, John F. Kennedy, Jr., died while piloting an aircraft. The 38-year-old crashed a small plane into the Atlantic Ocean, killing himself, his wife and his sister-in-law. This left daughter Caroline as the only surviving member of JFK’s immediate family.

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Caroline had initially intended to follow in her mother’s footsteps, attending the 1976 Winter Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria, as a photographer’s assistant. And while studying at Harvard University, she harbored ambitions of becoming a photojournalist. However, after realizing that the public’s interest in her and her family would compromise her ability to do the job, she changed course. Instead, she went to Columbia Law School, achieving a Doctor of Law degree in 1988.

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Caroline had, meanwhile, started to build her own family unit in 1986, after she married designer and author Edwin Schlossberg. The pair welcomed their first child Rose in 1988. Tatiana then followed two years later, with John – also known as Jack – arriving in 1993. By the turn of the century, Caroline had also started to follow in her father’s footsteps by entering into politics.

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In 2000, for example, Caroline championed Al Gore for the presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention. She then served the Office of Strategic Partnerships for the NYC Department of Education as director. And in 2008 she was appointed by Barack Obama to co-chair his Vice Presidential Search Committee. That same year, she also suggested that she’d be running for the U.S. Senate seat held by Hillary Clinton, who had been made Secretary of State.

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Caroline later withdrew her bid for the seat. But four years later she was nominated by President Barack Obama for the role of U.S. Ambassador to Japan. She was then appointed by unanimous consent later that same year, in the process becoming the first woman ever to occupy the position.

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However, Caroline’s political aspirations hit a stumbling block in 2016, after Donald Trump had been elected as the 45th President. She subsequently announced her resignation from her role as the U.S. Ambassador to Japan. She officially left her position in January 2017, a couple of days before Trump was sworn into office.

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Caroline discussed how proud she was to have served as an ambassador while speaking at the World Leaders Forum at Judson University in 2019. She told the crowd, “I was completely surprised and completely excited about [it]. For Japanese women to see a woman in a very visible role was meaningful… It was a great chance for me to represent America.”

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And Caroline hinted that she wasn’t done yet. She added, “The more you live in other places the more you see how indispensable this country really is. It really does inspire me to want to give back, to be worthy of that sacrifice and legacy that has gone before us.”

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Meanwhile, Caroline’s eldest daughter Rose Schlossberg attended the prestigious Harvard University – just like her mother before her. She studied English, while also developing a keen interest in film and fashion at the Ivy League institution. Rose then furthered her education by earning a Master of Professional Studies at New York University in 2013.

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Then, in 2016 Rose and actress and author Mara Nelson-Greenberg co-created End Times Girls Club, an internet comedy series in which they both also starred. The show focuses on two women who provide a crash course in how to survive an apocalyptic event. That year, Rose told website Mashable about its unlikely inspiration.

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Rose said, “It came up as a response to seeing the way that New York responded to Hurricane Sandy. And how people were grossly underprepared – specifically, girls in damsel in distress mode. I thought it would be interesting to create this world where girls have to be survivalists without compromising their cute factor.”

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As well as End Times Girls Club, Rose also contributed to a documentary six-parter which aired on Spike TV. Time: The Kalief Browder Story explored the injustice of a teenager from the Bronx who spent two years in solitary confinement – despite never being convicted of an offense. Rose not only co-penned the series, but she also co-produced it alongside Jay-Z.

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Rose’s credits in the TV and film industry don’t end there, either. She also worked as a production associate on multiple episodes of Brick City, a documentary series which in 2009 picked up the prestigious Peabody Award. She assumed a similar role on Triangle: Remembering the Fire and Hard Times: Lost on Long Island.

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As you’d probably expect, given her family background, Rose is also politically active. She gave money to Barack Obama’s presidential campaign in 2008. And two years later, she served as a volunteer for Democrat Alan Khazei’s U.S. Senate campaign in the Massachusetts special election. However, it’s apparently her younger brother Jack who’s more likely to seriously enter the political fray.

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Indeed, Jack Schlossberg is studying for an MBA at Harvard Law School. And in an interview on The Today Show, he revealed how proud he was to be part of a legacy that’s inspiring a new generation. He said, “People are taking it upon themselves, young people especially, organizing around the country to do what they think is right for our national interest and to choose good leadership.”

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Rose’s sister Tatiana also appears to be on a mission to help change the world. In 2019 she penned Inconspicuous Consumption: The Environmental Impact You Don’t Know You Have. She once tweeted, “It’s about the unseen ways the things we do and use all the time affect the environment, why fighting climate change and pollution is so hard, but why it’s crucial that we do, ASAP.”

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Rose herself appears to have inherited her family’s ability to make impassioned speeches. This was demonstrated when she recently spoke in a video celebrating what would have been her grandfather JFK’s centenary. She said, “This nation was founded by men of many nations and backgrounds. It was founded on the principle that all men are created equal and that the rights of every man are diminished when the rights of one man are threatened.”

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Rose also impressed with a speech at an event staged to celebrate an expansion of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in 2014. She said, “My grandparents believed that American civilization had come of age. And they transformed the White House into a stage for our nation’s greatest performing artists.”

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Rose continued, “They recognized that in order to demonstrate our full commitment to freedom, democracy, and the human spirit, our nation’s capital needed a world-class performing arts center. After my grandfather’s death, my grandmother, and my great aunts and uncles worked tirelessly to build and sustain this center. And my generation is proud to continue their commitment to excellence.”

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What’s more, Rose also seems to have inherited her grandmother Jackie’s striking sense of style. And although she was just five years old when her grandmother died, the pair still supposedly shared a strong bond. Indeed, it was Jackie’s idea to name Rose after JFK’s mother – despite the fact that she never really saw eye-to-eye with her. She reportedly once said of her mother-in-law, “The old bat’s about 100 years old, so let’s give her some respect.”

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Rose actually spent a lot of time with her grandmother in her early years. In fact, Jackie once accompanied her on a school trip to the American Museum of Natural History. The former first lady also regularly visited the Schlossbergs with baby Rose, taking her on other outings until she fell ill.

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According to Christian Andersen, a biographer of the First Lady, Jackie was determined to inspire her granddaughter Rose. He told the New York Post, “Jackie knew it was important to sow the seeds of good behavior early on, and she tried to do that in the final years of her life. It was a mission for her.”

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Until recently, though, Rose has kept a much lower profile when compared to her siblings and the rest of her famous family. She rarely goes to public events and doesn’t even have much in the way of a social media profile. Perhaps she was inspired to keep things private after Gawker published candid pictures taken when she was a college freshman.

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But ever since the New York Post dubbed her “Jackie 2.0,” Rose has started to attract more attention. InStyle magazine has described her as a Jackie Onassis doppelgänger, on account of her shared face shape and similar hair and eyes. Meanwhile, British tabloid the Daily Mail has noted that they share the same “delicate smile” and “slender frame.”

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Yet according to an old family friend, it’s not just Jackie’s looks that Rose has inherited. Harvard economist John Kenneth Galbraith cemented the comparison while reminiscing about a school trip back in the early ’90s. As he told biographer C. David Heymann, “Rose was all over the place, 20 yards ahead of us, a real hell-raiser. She reminded me of Jackie when she was young. Rose was very bright, and very independent.”

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Despite her lack of political aspirations, Rose has been tipped to become the next matriarch of the Kennedy family. In an interview with the New York Post, Arthur Schlesinger Jr., a family friend, said, “Rose was and is the leader of the pack – her opinion counts. She is highly regarded within the ever-expanding [Kennedy] circle. In many respects, she is the face and future of the clan.”

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